September 24, 2018

State approves 32-unit Sherborn affordable housing development

Photo | Courtesy
The Fields at Sherborn will be built similar to this development by Trask Development of Southborough.
Photo | Courtesy
A planning document for the Fields at Sherborn shows the layout of the development.

A 32-unit housing development with nine homes set aside under affordability restrictions has been approved in Sherborn.

The development, called The Fields at Sherborn, will be built in a wooded parcel on Washington Street (Route 16) across from Knollcrest Farm, a small cul-de-sac, and near the Hopkinton line.

The Fields at Sherborn, to be built by Trask Development of Southborough, is a so-called 40B development, named for a state law that allows developers to override local zoning if at least one-fourth of the development's units are set aside for affordably priced units. Trask was founded in 1992 by Ben Stevens, a graduate of Harvard University.

The development, which was approved by the Massachusetts Housing Financing Agency on Sept. 12, will include two- and three-bedroom units spread among nine buildings. The approval allows Trask to apply to the Sherborn Zoning Board of Appeals for local permitting.

Sherborn, with a population of just around 4,100, is one of the smallest communities inside the I-495 belt. It's also among the most expensive, with a median single-family home price over $800,000.

Other proposals, also to be built by Trask, according to the town website, include a development called Coolidge Crossing, which would add 88 units at 104 Coolidge St. in the northern edge of town. In that project, 22 units would be restricted for affordability.

A third 40B project in the pipeline is Green Lane, a 16-unit duplex development that would be built off the southern end of Green Lane near Maple Street, just west of the town center.

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